Off-Season Service at High Plains Camping

09/06/2009 at 6:59 pm Leave a comment

High Plains Camping is pleased to offer you a home for the night any night of the year. We simply ask that you understand the conditions in which you’ll be camping. Let’s talk about 2 factors you need to consider: Limited Hours and Winter Water Lines.

LIMITED HOURS: The park itself is open all year, as are the restroom and laundry facilities with coded locks during the night. The store and registration counter have very limited hours during the off-season, but that doesn’t mean you’re left on your own.

If you book a site (by phone or via our web page), and you arrive when our store / office is closed, we’ll have a package waiting for you on the bulletin board by the front door. Your specially prepared package will guide you to your site, explain how to use all of our facilities, and will outline what’s where on the property.

The signs on the door and white board explains to all (those with and those without reservations), how to go about finding a site that’s appropriate for your rig, how to pay, and how to use our facilities.

If you don’t book online), please be prepared to pay with cash or check (sorry we can not accept out of country checks) in case you arrive when our office is closed (only when we’re open can we process your credit card).

Winter camping can be fun, but only when precautions are taken.

Winter camping can be fun, but only when precautions are taken.

WINTER WATER LINES:
NW Kansas has “weather”! Winters are unpredictable, from deep and blowing snow to just blowing cold wind. Rarely is it not blowing!

The RV sites have electricity, water, and sewer service. The whole park has winter water service.

The only way we can provide winter water service to our guests is for each guest to take full responsibility of this priviledge. Understand how it all works.

Water hydrants are frost free but only when they’ve been turned off with the hose detached. Since they syphon the water back down the hydrant pipe (draining the actual hydrant so there’s nothing to freeze), if your hose is still attached when the hydrant has been shut off, that syphons the water from your hose into the pipe … taking away the “frost-free” aspect. Please turn off the water, disconnect your hose, and then turn the hydrant on and then off again to ensure it has properly drained itself.

It’s your responsibility to keep the hydrant from freezing. Know the expected low temperature, and take precautions by disconnecting and draining the hydrant before the water can freeze.

On very cold days and nights, if you must use the water it’s prudent to connect your hose, quickly take your shower and wash your dishes, then disconnect your hose, and then properly drain the hydrant again. If you feel you need to stay connected to the hydrant for a longer time than that, you need to use thermal heat protection on both your hose and the hydrant.

Warning! We impose a $200 fee to you if you freeze and break our hydrant plumbing, and a $400 fee if you do it, leave, and not tell us about it!

Also use of space heaters in your RV is strictly prohibited in our park. That said we are pleased to have you in our park and someone is always available to answer questions and help where needed.

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